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UNT 2048

Hey. Hey Alyssa.

AWESOME, then provided you’ve got the tech, the time, and the team, you might be able to get there. While finding a team of people who would work with you, I’d look at ways to fund the project, and look at possible business models to make sure the project continues to pay for itself, and in time, where it can pay you.

I hope you really pursue this into the ground and do it patiently while still seizing the right opportunities!

acecombatmusic:

legionnaireone:

acecombatmusic:

ilyapasternak:

acecombatmusic:

So this is a reask of an earlier question about the ‘big four’ tracks. I screwed up the posting because I’m bad at Tumblr. Taking another shot at this.

Note that every song of the ‘big four’ is epic and amazing in its own right. I love them all without question. This is about how they stack up against each other, in my personal opinion. You might disagree, but that’s what reblogging is for!

So without further ado, the Top Four ‘Big’ Ace Combat tracks:

#4. The Unsung War
When history witnesses a great change, the leitmotif reveals itself. Heard (and the poem repeated) over and over, this song did something I didn’t expect when I heard it: It tied the game together. It fits the theme of the final mission so perfectly: everything on the line, Belka’s last stand, and peace finally on the horizon. It’s not a true-final-battle in the same way that other fights are, the SOLG falls slowly and almost gracefully, making the fight substantially slower paced, which the music reflects.

Unfortunately, that kind of epicness only works in one place: Where it was intended to be. Playing the track to any other mission or game simply doesn’t fit, and listening to itself on its own isn’t as fulfilling as the others. Its inability to fit in elsewhere is what puts it at the bottom of this list.

#3: Zero
Here comes the snow. An epic dogfight between some of the best aces ever to fly the skies of Strangereal is presented to the players with a fitting song. The buildup takes a long while to get to its high points, which makes the rating suffer more than I’d like. The other part is the Spanish guitar and style to the music. As good as it is, it’s really hit or miss to its audience. I can play any of these tracks to my friends, but this is the only one that gets sighs or groans. Not everyone likes it in their music. The other thing which I really, truly wish was the case is that if the composers were going to go this route, the main chorus (with the Razgriz poem) should only have started once the V2 launched. They should have looped the earlier part of the track, or made two separate tracks for the song. The launch of V2 is too epic to play to any other part of the song.
All of these things combined puts Zero at the number three spot on the list.

#2: The Liberation of Gracemeria
While TLoG takes a full two and a half minutes to get to even the main part of the song, everything about the track fits and feels right. The main battles for Gracemeria take place in the center of the city, while the player must begin their push into the city from the outskirts. Taking the runway, radio station or the bay are all first steps to taking back the city, and that part of the mission should take the aforementioned two minutes or more. As a result, the timing fits very well. Outside of its mission, it’s one of the more calming tracks to hear. Each of the other tracks on this list has a very specific imagery to it, whereas TLoG’s is modular: it conforms to whatever route you took to get to where you are. Each mission choice in the prior missions, and this one, feels more real when you accomplish the task. This ‘adaptability’ as it were makes it much nicer to listen to outside of the game itself.
While the track goes above and beyond what a ‘culmination track’ should be, it doesn’t quite have the legacy or full-blown epicness of the others. That, combined with a lack of choir, puts it second from best on this list.

#1: Megalith: Agnus Dei
Was there any doubt that Megalith would be #1? What is probably the most iconic track EVER in Ace Combat takes the top spot with flying colors. It ushers in and sums up pretty much everything we love about the Ace Combat series. When someone says “Ace Combat music” or even “epic music,” Megalith is one of the first things that comes to a fan’s mind. The song is epic enough to have been used for the final boss battle for another game, completely separate from Ace Combat. Check it out here if you want.
The track itself is the first in Ace Combat to have a choir, since Rex Tremendae is the intro cutscene, not the mission itself (though it does an excellent job setting the stage.) It immediately throws the chorus at the player as soon as the track starts, unlike The Unsung War and Zero, which each have a bit longer of a buildup.
The chorus itself honestly feels more epic. The atmosphere that the mission, music and cast (“all of them have ribbon insignias!”) tie together better than any of the other songs ever made for Ace Combat.
And that’s why it’s at the top.

All aircraft follow Mobius 1!

So what do you think? Would you rate them differently, and why? Let me and the rest of the fandom know!

Why did I know 4 was going to be first :P

I’m expecting to catch some flak for putting Zero at #3 on the list, haha. Especially below TLoG. AC6 draws a lot of undeserved hate…

You were right about the track, Zero.

I think the reason that a lot of people moan and groan about this song is that it’s not what they expect from a song that’s tied to a rather climactic dogfight. Folks that aren’t familiar with Ace Combat are likely still stuck in the year Top Gun was released and think a dogfight is just a bunch of planes tumbling about to guitar music. And while I love 80’s hair metal, there’s more to dogfighting than just that.

In fact, one of the main concepts in that game’s art and musical direction was that dogfighting is like a dance where each plane takes turns following and leading the other around, except that at the ultimate end, one likely bursts into flames. I can see how flamenco music was the genre of choice to headline Zero. Flamenco is graceful, powerful and in many cases, terribly violent. It’s probably a perfect analogue to aerial dogfights.

And for Ace Combat fans, they’re likely expecting something orchestrated in nature, which they still got, but the flamenco guitar was not what they expected.

For doing something unexpected and being wildly successful at taking the idea of an aerial dogfight and making it work hand in hand with flamenco dancing at a conceptual level, I’d have placed Zero at #1. In fact, I would place Ace Combat Zero as the first place title in the series.

A lot of that holds true. The issue with the rankings is that while few will argue about how Megalith was wildly successful with its audience, Zero’s audience is far more divided about it. Personally, I enjoyed the music. I didn’t love everything about it (I also don’t like the halfway lull during Megalith) but it fit extremely well.

The lack of universal popularity is the main justification for its placement. Another significant factor, which is stated for why The Unsung War is #4, is that Zero doesn’t fit well outside of where it was intended to be. It might fight its niche (and even that is disputed, as has been said) but it fares poorly elsewhere. The two parts of the song (pre-chorus and chorus) don’t fit together in a way that could have it fit anywhere else, even another dogfight battle.

All of the songs are great. Zero just isn’t as across-the-board great as TLoG or Megalith.

Also, you’ve given me the thought that at some point I should rate all of the AC console games of 04+. I’ll type it up and have it ready in a few weeks maybe. It’s less true to my blog, but close enough, haha.
Maybe post it on ACN launch day…

Those are good arguments. Mine really are probably more related to the composer and what critique I would give him for the work, so as far as his efforts, Zero is the best because of what he accomplished with it, its conceptual depth, the complexity of the composition, and the composition itself.

But it is about appeal, so I get where you’re coming from.

One more note - if you can, play the Japanese version of Ace Combat 3. The US version, while still a good title, pales in comparison to its Japanese counterpart. I would say that it deserves to be ranked against the other, more modern titles. I’d almost bet that it would rank in the top 3.

kheradihr:

jadeprince:

rosalarian:

gastrophobia:

bigbigtruck:

(cont.) I became inspired again recently and I have been drawing and sketching everyday (for the past two years) as well as learning animation on my own. I am heavily influenced by your webcomic, but I just wanted to know if it was too late to pursue my dream without school and by myself at 28?

I started TJ and Amal at 31, with a weak art education and zero experience in comics, so you can probably guess where I stand on the matter!

I wish our culture didn’t place such heavy emphasis on “making it” in your teens and twenties; that the (justifiable!) attention paid to prodigies wouldn’t set “prodigy” as the norm.  This kind of BS does everyone a disservice.

If you have a dream and the resources/ability to pursue it, there’s no reason to sit it out just because “everyone makes it by 25.” Because everyone DOESN’T make it by 25. Some do, some don’t, whatever.
What’s more, age can bring experience that will inform your work — work you couldn’t have made at 20 or 25.

Sometimes when I get discouraged about this stuff, it helps to remember an anecdote I read a few years ago—
A retiree mentions to her friend that she’s considering going back to college and finishing her degree.
"What, at 65?" says her friend, "You’ll be at least 40 years older than everyone else in class!"
To which the lady replies, “oh, so you think I should wait till I’m 70?”

There’s no going backwards.

Good luck!

I started Gastrophobia at 31! Sounds like that’s the magic number! Wait three years and you’ll finally be ready to play with the grown ups, kid.

I got a very early start, coming out with my first webcomics when I was still a teenager. And everyone always told me how young I was to be so successful. And now there’s a new crop of people younger than me who are huge successes, and sometimes I catch myself feeling like I’m slowing down, and these whippersnappers are gonna leave me in the dust. And then I give myself a mental face-slap and remind myself my life is nowhere close to over and I have so much time ahead of me to keep going, and that’s awesome.

I just started a burlesque career a couple years ago. There are plenty of performers who started even older than me. Who knows how I’ll reinvent myself in another ten years? So much potential. My age has nothing to do with it.

This is stuff I really need to hear. I’m so tired of anecdotes about genius teenagers and people getting rich/famous/successful before they can even legally drink. Give me all the stories of 40-somethings going from office-work to making movies, 60 year olds retiring from retail to become famous painters, 32 year olds with non-art degrees starting comics and struggling to get noticed until they’re 40 and then getting all the Eisner awards. 

My spouse legionnaireone is 31 (32 in Sept) and he’s hoping to start his space opera webcomic Vanguard 17 sometime this summer. No one is ever too old to do something!

I work as the lead designer for a major university in my state, and I really do love my job. I wouldn’t have gotten into the design world if I didn’t absolutely love it. However, I’m still an artist at heart, and growing up with works like Macross/Robotech, Gundam, then getting into more mature things as I got older, I decided to do my own thing and start work on the Vanguard 17 comic. I hope I can launch it this summer, it’s been about 2 years in the making.

I don’t want to sound to moto, but there’s the old saying, “The best day was yesterday. The next best day is today.”

If you’re aiming to get into an existing animation studio, it might be hard without a book/reel of work behind you. But don’t let that get in your way - you can still build a solid book/reel with your own work or work in collaboration with other artists.

Alternately, you can decide to strike out on your own. Either way, do care ful research about what you want do, then assemble the pieces you need to get there.

I say this to the guys in my milsim team when we have to take the field  - Good hunting.

acecombatmusic:

ilyapasternak:

acecombatmusic:

So this is a reask of an earlier question about the ‘big four’ tracks. I screwed up the posting because I’m bad at Tumblr. Taking another shot at this.

Note that every song of the ‘big four’ is epic and amazing in its own right. I love them all without question. This is about how they stack up against each other, in my personal opinion. You might disagree, but that’s what reblogging is for!

So without further ado, the Top Four ‘Big’ Ace Combat tracks:

#4. The Unsung War
When history witnesses a great change, the leitmotif reveals itself. Heard (and the poem repeated) over and over, this song did something I didn’t expect when I heard it: It tied the game together. It fits the theme of the final mission so perfectly: everything on the line, Belka’s last stand, and peace finally on the horizon. It’s not a true-final-battle in the same way that other fights are, the SOLG falls slowly and almost gracefully, making the fight substantially slower paced, which the music reflects.

Unfortunately, that kind of epicness only works in one place: Where it was intended to be. Playing the track to any other mission or game simply doesn’t fit, and listening to itself on its own isn’t as fulfilling as the others. Its inability to fit in elsewhere is what puts it at the bottom of this list.

#3: Zero
Here comes the snow. An epic dogfight between some of the best aces ever to fly the skies of Strangereal is presented to the players with a fitting song. The buildup takes a long while to get to its high points, which makes the rating suffer more than I’d like. The other part is the Spanish guitar and style to the music. As good as it is, it’s really hit or miss to its audience. I can play any of these tracks to my friends, but this is the only one that gets sighs or groans. Not everyone likes it in their music. The other thing which I really, truly wish was the case is that if the composers were going to go this route, the main chorus (with the Razgriz poem) should only have started once the V2 launched. They should have looped the earlier part of the track, or made two separate tracks for the song. The launch of V2 is too epic to play to any other part of the song.
All of these things combined puts Zero at the number three spot on the list.

#2: The Liberation of Gracemeria
While TLoG takes a full two and a half minutes to get to even the main part of the song, everything about the track fits and feels right. The main battles for Gracemeria take place in the center of the city, while the player must begin their push into the city from the outskirts. Taking the runway, radio station or the bay are all first steps to taking back the city, and that part of the mission should take the aforementioned two minutes or more. As a result, the timing fits very well. Outside of its mission, it’s one of the more calming tracks to hear. Each of the other tracks on this list has a very specific imagery to it, whereas TLoG’s is modular: it conforms to whatever route you took to get to where you are. Each mission choice in the prior missions, and this one, feels more real when you accomplish the task. This ‘adaptability’ as it were makes it much nicer to listen to outside of the game itself.
While the track goes above and beyond what a ‘culmination track’ should be, it doesn’t quite have the legacy or full-blown epicness of the others. That, combined with a lack of choir, puts it second from best on this list.

#1: Megalith: Agnus Dei
Was there any doubt that Megalith would be #1? What is probably the most iconic track EVER in Ace Combat takes the top spot with flying colors. It ushers in and sums up pretty much everything we love about the Ace Combat series. When someone says “Ace Combat music” or even “epic music,” Megalith is one of the first things that comes to a fan’s mind. The song is epic enough to have been used for the final boss battle for another game, completely separate from Ace Combat. Check it out here if you want.
The track itself is the first in Ace Combat to have a choir, since Rex Tremendae is the intro cutscene, not the mission itself (though it does an excellent job setting the stage.) It immediately throws the chorus at the player as soon as the track starts, unlike The Unsung War and Zero, which each have a bit longer of a buildup.
The chorus itself honestly feels more epic. The atmosphere that the mission, music and cast (“all of them have ribbon insignias!”) tie together better than any of the other songs ever made for Ace Combat.
And that’s why it’s at the top.

All aircraft follow Mobius 1!

So what do you think? Would you rate them differently, and why? Let me and the rest of the fandom know!

Why did I know 4 was going to be first :P

I’m expecting to catch some flak for putting Zero at #3 on the list, haha. Especially below TLoG. AC6 draws a lot of undeserved hate…

You were right about the track, Zero.

I think the reason that a lot of people moan and groan about this song is that it’s not what they expect from a song that’s tied to a rather climactic dogfight. Folks that aren’t familiar with Ace Combat are likely still stuck in the year Top Gun was released and think a dogfight is just a bunch of planes tumbling about to guitar music. And while I love 80’s hair metal, there’s more to dogfighting than just that.

In fact, one of the main concepts in that game’s art and musical direction was that dogfighting is like a dance where each plane takes turns following and leading the other around, except that at the ultimate end, one likely bursts into flames. I can see how flamenco music was the genre of choice to headline Zero. Flamenco is graceful, powerful and in many cases, terribly violent. It’s probably a perfect analogue to aerial dogfights.

And for Ace Combat fans, they’re likely expecting something orchestrated in nature, which they still got, but the flamenco guitar was not what they expected.

For doing something unexpected and being wildly successful at taking the idea of an aerial dogfight and making it work hand in hand with flamenco dancing at a conceptual level, I’d have placed Zero at #1. In fact, I would place Ace Combat Zero as the first place title in the series.

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